Sauerkraut and giardiniera

Today, I made some sauerkraut and giardiniera.  The sauerkraut was pretty much the same as I always do it:

1 head of green cabbage
1 head of red cabbage
3 carrots
8 garlic cloves
2 granny smith apples
caraway seeds (1 Tsp?)
uniodized salt (~0.5 cups)

Pretty simple…  Just chop the cabbage as thin as you can, grate the carrots and apples, mince the garlic cloves, and then mix it all up with the caraway seeds and salt.  Sometimes I crunch up the cabbage to make it easier for the salt to break the cell walls, but if you just add enough salt, the cell walls will bust all on their own and you’ll be able to keep you sauerkraut submerged under cabbage juice.  Anyways, after you mix it all up and it’s created enough juice to be submerged, put a plate on top and then something heavy (rock, jar full of water, whatever), and then put a lid on top of your container.  That’s it.

For the giardiniera, I pretty much just followed this:

http://thepauperedchef.com/2009/03/giardiniera.html

 

I’ll try to post on permaculture, fermentation, living practices, self-tracking, and a host of other things over the next bit of time.

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Color me amused

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 2,900 times in 2010. That’s about 7 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 14 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 55 posts. There were 55 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 104mb. That’s about 1 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was April 26th with 139 views. The most popular post that day was IMG_1105.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were wwoofusa.org, meetup.com, mail.yahoo.com, Google Reader, and en.search.wordpress.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for squatting toilet, eudaimonia farm, eudaimoniafarm.wordpress.com, first flush, and eudaimonia.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

About February 2009

2

BEES! May 2010
5 comments

3

Busyness, bag of hair, and tea drying May 2010
4 comments

4

Outhouse March 2010
3 comments

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Back!

After a hiatus in Oakland, I’m back on the farm, which is disheveled, but nowhere near as rough as I thought it would be after the hottest and driest summer in southern Illinois history. Most of my trees seem alive, the bees are alive (although I haven’t checked to see how much they’ve produced), the pond is about 3 feet below it’s top level, and the grape vines look terrible, but roughly like other grape vines in the area. Since being back, I’ve spread out a bunch of cattail seeds and cut a pathway to the garden. Soon, I’ll fill up the garden with manure and mulch all the trees and grape vines.

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BEES!

Ahhhh! Actually, not really.  I mean, bees are around; they’re just not terrifying.  This morning, I picked up my box of bees from the post office, where the postmistresses tried to keep their distance from that buzzing. Holding the box as far away as they could and keeping their heads up, making their necks easy prey for the assassinly bees! Again, not really.  I followed the directions on what to do with the bees that I found here. There wasn’t much to it: spray the hive with sugar water, spray the bees with sugar water anytime they started doing anything, open the box, shake the bees out into the hive, set the queen up, and then put the lid back on. I only got stung once and now the bees are set up in their bumble hive.

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Busyness, bag of hair, and tea drying

I’ve been getting quite a bit done the past few days: I stained the outhouse, sealed the gap between the outhouse and woodshed roof, put hair around the trees and grape vines (to keep deer away), did some more planting, weeded, and cut a bunch of goldenrod to dry for tea. And I let the chickens free range, which was a bit nerve racking, because I already lost a few to my neighbor’s dogs, but the dogs haven’t been back since I scared them off.  Anyways, the chickens seem to like it and I’m happy to have them try to forage a bit more.

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Water system

As of now, the water “system” consists of two parts: the pond and the cistern.

The pond collects water from the upper pasture just through overflow; there are no drainage tiles or grates below the surface collecting water anywhere.  The pipe on the pond goes to the bottom of the gully and empties onto a piece of plywood and then onto some rocks.  I don’t really do anything with the water besides gather it in buckets to water the plants.  If I’m feeling super productive, I may try to put some windmill so that I can pump the water over a little ridge and then to the gardens, but I’m not entirely sure on how to do that yet.  So it’s buckets for now.

The cistern collects water from the roof.  I don’t have any special filter or first flush system on it, as I thought I was going to (see this post).  I talked to an old farmer and he told me that I should just filter the water on the back end instead of trying to filter it and then store it.  That ended up being a lot easier, because the filter that I had been building was going to be so large that it was going to be difficult to support.  Consequently, I got myself a little Berkey water filter.  For drinking water, I just get a pitcher of water from the cistern and pour it into the filter.  The filter could also filter the pond water and make it potable, but I don’t foresee any circumstances under which I’d do that.  As for showers, I just put water in my black shower bag and then leave it in the sun.  Eventually, I’m going to try to make a dedicated shower water system from the water coming off the outhouse and woodshed, but that’s some time off.

As of now, the water “system” consists of two parts: the pond and the

cistern.

The pond collects water from the upper pasture just through overflow;

there are no drainage tiles or grates below the surface collecting

water anywhere.  The pipe on the pond goes to the bottom of the gully

and empties onto a piece of plywood and then onto some rocks.  I

don’t really do anything with the water besides gather it in buckets

to water the plants.  If I’m feeling super productive, I may try to

put some windmill so that I can pump the water over a little ridge

and then to the gardens, but I’m not entirely sure on how to do that

yet.  So it’s buckets for now.

The cistern collects water from the roof.  I don’t have any special

filter or first flush system on it, as I thought I was going to (see

this post).  I talked to an old farmer and he told me that I should

just filter the water on the back end instead of trying to filter it

and then store it.  That ended up being a lot easier, because the

filter that I had been building was going to be so large that it was

going to be difficult to support.  Consequently, I got myself a

little Berkey water filter.  For drinking water, I just get a pitcher

of water from the cistern and pour it into the filter.  The filter

could also filter the pond water and make it potable, but I don’t

foresee any circumstances under which I’d do that.  As for showers, I

just put water in my black shower bag and then leave it in the sun.

Eventually, I’m going to try to make a dedicated shower water system

from the water coming off the outhouse and woodshed, but that’s some

time off.

Comments (3)

Sunday Morning

One thing that I should share is Sunday Morning by Wallace Stevens.  It’s one of the things that is present in my thoughts as I do work around the farm, and it’s a pretty worthwhile thing for everyone to read.  Enjoy!

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